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Board Chair - Rise Collective

Founded in 2016 RISE runs creative skills development projects, produces inspirational live events and offers mentorship, work experience, employment and networking opportunities. Their projects have all been co-designed to be replicable and scalable - with a view to these being delivered by trained young people in the future, throughout the UK and beyond. RISE are looking for an experienced, enterprising and talented advocate of youth development and the arts to chair RISE’s board at an exciting time for our organisation. They will help them develop and implement a strategic plan, deepen our financial sustainability and strengthen their governance. This person will be able to provide inclusive, balanced and inspiring leadership to the Board and ensure that each trustee fulfils their duties and responsibilities for the effective governance of our charity. They will hold the Board to account for RISE’s mission and vision and always uphold our values. Key Deliverables - Leading the development of RISE’s Strategic Plan 2020 -2023 including emerging opportunities and risks and monitorable objectives - Supporting RISE to achieve a diversified funding model; achieving medium to long-term sustainability - Raising the professional and public profile of RISE and its members in the UK - Continuing to build positive relationships with a range of partners and stakeholders - Leading the identification and selection of trustees to diversify and strengthen our Board Responsibilities - Provide leadership to the Board in its strategic role and give direction in terms of policy making - Embed equality and diversity in mission, strategy and decision-making - Chair Board and other meetings and facilitate positive, solution-based discussion - Represent the Charity and act as spokesperson where appropriate - Carry out annual reviews of the Board and Trustees - Identify and resolve any conflict on the Board and in the organisation, acting to protect its reputation and preserve morale - Lead the Board in ensuring that it fulfils its governance responsibilities and complies with its governing document, charity law, company law and any other relevant legislation and regulations - Ensure appropriate goals are set for the resources available to the organisation - Ensure appropriate arrangements are in place to support, monitor and review the work of the Directors, employees and volunteers Help promote the organisation to a wider audience of potential funders and beneficiaries. - Ensure an effective relationship between staff, volunteers, members, and other stakeholders - Ensure the organisation has appropriate procedures to comply with current legislation and good practice, including safeguarding, employment, health and safety, non-discrimination Equality and Diversity RISE want their Board to play a key role in embedding and safeguarding equality and diversity throughout our mission, strategy and culture. As such you will: - Champion equality and diversity: through championing equality, diversity and an inclusive culture from the top of the organisation, you will help lead a culture of equality and diversity. - Embed equality and diversity: periodically, board members will be involved in developing new strategies and approving policies and operational plans. All board members will be passionate about and responsible for ensuring equality and diversity are appropriately embedded and appropriate key performance indicators are in place. - Shape approach: by going beyond assuring legal compliance of equality law to define and shape our approach to equality and diversity - Ensure accountability: board members will be involved in the annual review of KPIs, including those on equality and diversity. Experience and Skills - Success in delivering growth and change management - including strategic development (essential) - Successful fundraising or entrepreneurial activities (essential) - Experience of external representation, delivering presentations and managing stakeholders (essential) - Experience of chairing meetings and events (essential) - Experience working within the creative arts/ media or the positive transformative effect of creative activity on young people (desirable) - Experience of charity/corporate governance and working with or as part of a Board of Trustees (desirable) Qualities - Commitment to amplifying the voices of marginalised young people, both within and out of the organisation - Innate understanding of culture, privilege and power - Willingness to positively challenge the Board and Directors and introduce new ways of thinking - A strong and visible passion and commitment to RISE, its vision and values - The personal gravitas needed to lead the Board of a growing organisation - Strong interpersonal and relationship building abilities and ability to thrive in an ambassadorial role - Tact and diplomacy with the ability to listen and engage effectively - Strong networking capabilities that can be utilised for the benefit of the charity Appointment length: The chair will serve a three-year term and can be re-appointed for one additional term. For more details, download the link below To apply please send: - a short statement: this can be written/and or sent by wetransfer video - and CV addressing the role description and person specification to mahla@therisecollective.org.uk by 1st November 2020. https://therisecollective.org.uk/about

Welfare Rights Advisors - Advice4Renters - Part Time and Full Time

Advice4Renters has been providing services for private renters for over thirty years. We started life as a campaigning organisation, calling for better rights for those living in private rented accommodation. Over the years, we achieved some major successes, including property licensing and, more recently, the outlawing of low energy rated lettings. Our advice service grew up alongside our campaigning work, to help private tenants understand and secure their rights. Responsibilities - Delivering welfare information advice and advocacy - Co-ordination and Co-working - Administration & data recording - Networking, campaigning and client engagement - Professional Development For full key tasks and responsibilities click follow this link https://bit.ly/2Sq8jH2 Requirements Applicants should have at least two years’ experience of delivering benefits advice, including Tribunal appeals. They should share our passion for helping and empowering members of our diverse communities and be committed to continuous improvement for themselves and the team. For full job requirements please scroll to the end of this page https://bit.ly/2Sq8jH2 Salary: £25k (f/t) Location: Services may be delivered at Advice4Renters, Brent Community Hubs, medical settings such as GP surgeries or remotely, by ‘phone, video link Closing Date: 5pm, 02 November 2020 For further information and application pack, please click on the following links: Job Description
Information for Candidates
Application Form
Equal Opportunities Form Please return your application and the Equal Opportunities forms by email to tiziana.falco@advice4renters.org.uk or by post for the attention of Tiziana Falco, Advice4Renters, 36-38 Willesden Lane, NW6 7ST CVs WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

Levelling Up Our Communities: Proposals For a New Social Covenant - The Danny Kruger Report

Danny Kruger, an MP and former charity leader, had been requested by the UK government to create a report on how they will be able to make the most out of the voluntary sector in the UK’s recovery from COVID-19. On the 24th September, this was released. And the report itself divides into three key areas: Power, People and Place. Power Mr Kruger is clear that there would need to be reform of public procurement. His suggestion is that a Community Power Act would allow local areas to develop their own procurement priorities based on Commissioning for Public Value. This would be designed and led by communities themselves. It would put local people at the heart of making decisions locally as the Act would potentially be allied with Community Improvement Districts. The report recognises a need for public engagement and with that there is a need for investment in social infrastructure. There is a proposal that has been long in existence, that what is needed is a Civil Society Improvement Agency. The report emphasises a need for better use of data and digital inclusion, and some ambitious ideas using UN indicators to measure the impact of civil society. It is realistic however in that it proposes the need for digital relationships to have better structure in society. Using Big Techs as an example of agents acting in a non-propriety manner. It also says that Government and Civil Society are not up to scratch with regard to data collecting. Main Recommendations New official measures to understand and track the economic and social contribution of civil society Data from government and civil society saying where funding goes and what it delivers. Big Tech firms to finance and co-design non-prop design infrastructure for communities. A new commitment to ‘social value’ commissioning, considering the whole of government accounts rather than a single budget A Community Power Act, creating the ‘Community Right to Serve’ by which community groups can challenge for a role in the design and delivery of public services Community Improvement Districts or ‘pop-up parishes’ with time-limited freedoms and flexibilities to deliver community-led change A new national institution to help local places and organisations improve performance and exercise greater responsibility; and to build an index of social infrastructure that can inform both national and local policy making. People The main takeaway from the report is the Volunteer Passport. What this means, is that once vetted you are able to volunteer during the good times and the bad! Under the scheme, volunteers could offer to be a part of a National Reserve, Community Support or Public Service group of volunteers. It applauds the Kickstart Scheme for youth employment, however emphasises that there is a need for younger people to engage with civil society longer term. Finally, the report focuses on faith group activities. It recognises that they have value in times of crisis, but that they have been too insular. It says that they should look to help more broadly with societal issues such as homelessness and debt. Main Recommendations A Volunteer Passport system to match the supply of and demand for volunteers, with options to: join a new National Volunteer Reserve to help with future emergencies and with environmental projects; deliver ongoing mutual aid to people in crisis; fulfil formal public service roles such as magistrates or charity trustees Service opportunities for young people, funded through the Kickstart programme, to work on a variety of social and environmental projects A new deal with faith communities, by which government supports a greater role for faith groups in meeting social challenges An annual ‘Neighbour Day’ bank holiday to celebrate communities’ work together. Place Small charities are mentioned specifically on pg 43, through the lens of working locally. It calls for local councils to be a convenor and enabler of civil society and a continued emphasis on place making and saving community assets. The section and report concludes with a focus on philanthropy and calls on the creation of a Community Recovery Fund, a Levelling Up Communities Fund, and reform of the National Lottery Community Fund to allow for local decision making. In order to free up money for place based making, the author suggests that the UK International Development Budget be used to match fund international philanthropists willing to invest in the UK. Main Recommendations Planning rules to promote the creation of social capital through good design, the recognition of the need for gathering places, and community ownership of public assets. Policy to support independent social infrastructure, including professional ‘connectors’ charged with linking local services together, and physical hubs to co-locate services and enable gathering A new focus on the modern local library, often community-managed, delivering business start-up support and digital inclusion for local communities Policy to make it easier to start and run a charity, and create a modern version of the local CVS A ‘match trade’ scheme to support social enterprises, which play a crucial role in economic and social development in disadvantaged communities Options to boost philanthropy, including civic crowdfunding, and social investment 18. A new £500m Community Recovery Fund, financed by the allocation of the dormant National Fund, for charities and community groups supporting the transition from the ‘response’ to the ‘recovery’ phase Consult on the use of the £2bn+ which will shortly be available from new dormant assets: options include a new endowment, the Levelling Up Communities (LUC) Fund, for perpetual investment in long-term, transformational, community-led local projects in left-behind areas. Review the National Lottery Community Fund, which is now 25 years old, with a view to a more local and community-led distribution model. For the full report, follow the link https://www.dannykruger.org.uk/communities-report The Next Steps It is not clear what will happen next. It has been rumoured that there will be a national conversation to progress the recommendations. For our part at SCC, we will be holding a special meeting to discuss the next stage of a collective response to the report. SCC has now been invited to a meeting with Mr Kruger, and we would really welcome your views in advance. The meeting will be on Tuesday 13th October 2020, 12noon -1pm .We will also be tabling the Kruger report at relevant Meet-Ups in October, especially for the International and Faith Based sector.

#NeverMoreNeeded

Young Barnet Foundation Young Barnet Foundation is a membership organisation for hundreds of locally based children and young people’s charities/community groups delivering to our young people across LB of Barnet. They invest in, connect and grow our members in a variety of ways to enhance opportunities, activities and services for the 99,000 young people across Barnet. They are here to compliment the other infrastructure support across the borough and work closely under a ‘Barnet Together’ collaboration with Inclusion Barnet and Volunteering Barnet to pool expertise and resources to support members who serve their communities. Coronavirus saw great work across the borough by many community groups as they set out to support and feed our most vulnerable during the crisis. Young Barnet Foundation as Barnet Together have and will continue to work to help coordinate and support these groups over the coming months. Their two key funders are part of London Funders network and we welcomed the swift confirmation that funders would be supportive and flexible with their funding, for this we are extremely thankful. Short term funding is secured to support the work we do, but the longer-term future looks more insecure, we have had to curtail fundraising events and there is uncertainty about future funding availability. We already see members, many of which, like ourselves are very small, start to struggle. The services to support and scaffold their membership will be needed now more than ever as organisations see an increase in demand for their services whilst finding funding even harder to come by. YBF do also see this as an opportunity to explore different ways of working, how technology can best be used both in delivery and back office, for organisations to help make tight finances go further as working practices are forced to be adapted. The small community based charities are deep routed and highly knowledgeable in our communities, many having built up trusted relationships over many years and will need to offer support as the full effect of the COVID-19 shut down on the economy, physical and mental health are clearer. YBF are calling on everyone at this time to be a generous leader. Supporting charities doesn’t always have to always be financial donations. Individuals and businesses can offer time, expertise and space to your locally based charities. They are #NeverMoreNeeded. DISH DISH was formed in 1991 as a charity offering information, advice and support to people with disabilities. The momentum behind forming DISH and working with other small charities in the area was to ensure the disability community weren’t left behind and that they could live their lives with dignity, choice and independence. Within the last few years and especially since the welfare reforms, the demand for their services has grown exponentially. They also support older members of their community with attendance Allowance applications. It is a small team who all have lived experience of disability either as a parent, young carer and carer. The last few months has been a period of uncertainty. This has meant a complete full stop on any fundraising events they had planned, but also no more income via Trusts and Foundations which had raised some significant amounts early on in the year. It was understandable that this would happen. DISH had projected a return on fundraising and foundations alone to be in excess of £15,000 -£20,000. It meant huge pressure in trying to obtain emergency funding via various outlets and ensuring they could keep offering our services whilst planning for our post COVID-19 future. They furloughed an office member of staff and the other 3 caseworkers on a rotational basis so we could keep offering the service, this relieved some pressure on the salary bill, but as they don’t pay very much, it didn’t make a huge dent. Fortunately, they have come through it and are grateful to all the support they received both locally and nationally ( thanks SCC ) I have developed new financial processes and also worked on a new risk management strategy so we can ensure our sustainability. There is now a discussion as to whether they go completely home based and reduce costs centrally – office, copier, phones etc which would pay supplement their income. They have always been needed, but we know we will have to increase capacity to meet the demand. They are #NeverMoreNeeded. York Road Project York Road Project are a homelessness charity based in Woking, Surrey. Their ultimate aim is to support anyone experiencing homelessness into permanent accommodation. They recognise that not everyone is ready to live independently and support them with any difficulties creating barriers to accessing stable accommodation. York Road were able to respond very quickly to the lockdown. A taskforce was put together and meetings moved very quickly. The team were able to manage their clients panic and worry and worked with Woking Borough Council to be able to provide quick and safe accommodation. They utilised their relationships with local governments and councils to be able to get communications out to the public to help with food donations. The team were able to think outside the box. Within a large hall, were set up to provide ‘pods’ for their clients. They could provide power and the necessary commodities each person required. YRP have been doing okay financially, purely because of the funders and being able to galvanise the public support. However, the normal funds that are so needed for winter may not be available this year and they need to make sure they are not jumping on the money. They have seen a fantastic community spirit but they cannot relying on this lasting forever. Their work is vital and they are #NeverMoreNeeded.

Suicide Prevention Day 2020 - Nav Mirza - Dads Unlimited

In 2018, in the UK and Republic of Ireland, more than 6,800 people died of suicide. Every life lost to suicide is a tragedy. But not being okay is still widely stigmatised. And governments can still make better, more ambitious plans to prevent suicide. When we see a sign on a car that says “baby on board” or “disabled driver” – naturally we are more patient with that driver; we slow down and take care because we know there is a vulnerable person inside. Would we be so patient and attentive if that sign wasn’t there? Truth is we don’t know what struggles people are going through, because we don’t wear signs telling us. You never see a sign that says “I’m going through a divorce” – or “I haven’t seen my children for 2 years”, or “I’m feeling depressed” or “I’ve just been diagnosed with a terminal illness”. If we could I’m sure we would be kinder. Mental health problems are invisible illnesses. Pain, sadness, anxiety and depression do not discriminate. We believe, we all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other's happiness, not by each other's misery; but perhaps we have lost our way. Technology that gives abundance has left us in want. Social media, created to bring us closer together, has left us further apart. Our knowledge has made us cynical. Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than technology we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. The men we work with say their life is now left dripping down the walls; A dream that cannot breathe in this their new harsh reality; Having been sold what they cannot buy. As they talk, there is a bell that we hear. It is the sound of the human spirit ringing – full with anticipation, fear, anxiety and hope! Everywhere they go – all they feel is the shattered glass of their dreams cutting their feet, reminding them, constantly, of all that has been lost. The home they used to share, now echoes with the deafening silence of their children’s laughter. They feel their absence like a draft. The smell of a once cherished teddy bear or clothing, their only reminder of a child they once held. Their loneliness and isolation driving them deeper into despair and hopelessness. Their cries, their midnight cries, heard by nobody. Tears left unwiped. Their stories, past, present and future, now are all written in scars. It is impossible to mistake the anguish and suffering in their voice. They are broken. We must all, therefore, make a greater effort to understand the effect of family breakdown; and hence the possibility that the person before you may be more ‘vulnerable’ as a result. And vulnerable is precisely what they are; and in doing so we can unbreak the broken. It is worth remembering, that every parent lost to suicide, because of family breakdown is preventable; it’s not inevitable. In 2019, DU prevented 91 men from completing suicide, who initially came to us with suicidal ideation. Family breakdown is, and always will be, a lose/lose sum game. And seen through the eyes of a child, it is nothing less than a tragedy. The difference between what was….and what will never be. But all of us can work to change a small portion of events for someone else. We must commit to working harder together, and form a coalition of the willing to alleviate the suffering from the consequential effects of family breakdown, and improve the mental health of parents and children. Because, after all, are we not the change that they have been waiting for? Nav Mirza - Dads Unlimited https://www.dadsunltd.org.uk/

The Aid Workers - #HumanitarianDay

We know about the challenges for charities working within the UK, but what about those that are working abroad? This Humanitarian Day, we want to celebrate aid workers and highlight the challenging work of our small international charities who are working with some of the most vulnerable people in the world. Although the sector as a whole has been hit hard by COVID-19, international charities and organisations have received some of the biggest blows. Few are eligible for the Government’s Coronavirus Community Support Fund, and many trusts and foundations have amended their criteria, and no longer include projects abroad. What is certain however, is that this community of aid workers are still tirelessly working to try help transform the lives of their beneficiaries. We asked our members what the life of an aid worker is like at the moment, and here is what they had to say. EdUkaid Since 2003, EdUKaid has been helping the poorest children in Tanzania to get the education they so desperately need. Based in the remote Mtwara region of southern Tanzania, their work is in partnership with local communities to improve the quality of education so that children have the chance of a better life. 1. What does it mean to be an aid worker, working during the COVID-19 crisis? As an aid worker I am used to having to respond to different challenges and working for a small charity means that I can adapt more easily than perhaps those working for large NGOs. This meant that my charity, EdUKaid, was able to react quickly to COVID-19 in Tanzania during the outbreak and respond appropriately as the situation changed. The biggest challenge has been the impact on our income at the time when our beneficiaries need us more than ever. 2. As an aid worker, what kind of world are you living in right now? A world full of hope and opportunity. Our beneficiaries show us every day that, with a little help, you can still achieve so much even in most difficult circumstances. 3. What does the future look like for those you work with? For the communities in which we work, life and death is an everyday occurrence and they are more fearful of malaria or hunger than COVID-19. These people live hand to mouth, day to day, so future is a difficult concept to consider. As an aid worker I am fearful that much of the incredible progress achieved by the small NGOs will be lost as funding disappears and charities risk closure and fearful that this ‘world full of hope and opportunity’ will disappear for the poorest communities. https://www.edukaid.com/ RARE In 2008, Rare Tea Company began working with Satemwa Tea Estate in Malawi, Africa. Founder Henrietta Lovell visited Satemwa and saw the possibility of creating social change by re-investing a percentage of the revenue from Rare Tea sales into the young people connected to the Estate. Rare Charity’s focus is to create educational opportunities within tea producing communities. 1. What does it mean to be an aid worker, working during the COVID-19 crisis? It's subjective, but I would say that it means that you continue your commitment to support the most vulnerable and deliver programmes as safely as possible. 2. As an aid worker, what kind of world are you living in right now? The same world as we are all living in - none of us are safe until all of us are safe. The world has got more dangerous now, but COVID is one of the many challenges Malawians face. 3. What does the future look like for those you work with? We stay hopeful. It depends on the spread of COVID in Malawi. https://www.rarecharity.com/ S.A.L.V.E S.A.L.V.E. International (Support And Love Via Education) works in a variety ways to reduce the number of children having to live on the streets of Uganda. They have many programmes such as street outreach, halfway homes, drug rehabilitation programmes and many more, all of which have education at the heart of them. 1. What does it mean to be an aid worker, working during the COVID-19 crisis? Normal challenges are amplified and new ones are appearing daily. How can the children we work with who live on the streets adhere to a curfew, when they simply have nowhere to go? We have been working hard to find solutions in a rapidly changing environment. It also means relying upon the selflessness of our staff who are willing to risk their own health and that of their families by continuing to work in a people-facing role during the Covid crisis. 2. As an aid worker, what kind of world are you living in right now? A strange one, but one that is not devoid of hope: we see the smiles of the people we help and we know that we will make it through this. Despite the darkness, we have been overwhelmed by the generosity and kindness of others. The global community has come together and helped empower us to help the people who need us most. 3. What does the future look like for those you work with? We are still working towards a mission to end homelessness, but with poverty increasing, education being inaccessible and the risk of more children turning to the streets for food or shelter, we are realistic that there may be difficult times ahead. We expect to see an increase in child homelessness and all of the problems that go with this including sexual abuse, violence, trafficking and addiction https://www.salveinternational.org/ Azuko AzuKo is a small architecture charity, working in UK and Bangladesh to improve living conditions for people in poverty. Typically they work with communities longterm, designing improvements to housing, ensuring access to safe water and sanitation. 1. What dos it mean to be an aid worker during COVID-19 Our frontline staff have been working tirelessly to deliver vital hygiene supplies to those without access to the basics – soap, sanitiser, disinfectant, face masks and other PPE. We have reached over 2,400 families and are expanding our efforts across the district of Dinajpur as the crisis continues. Community members are also volunteering to ensure we reach the most vulnerable. As the UK begins to return to a ‘new normal’ the situation in many parts of South Asia is worsening. Working on the frontline is physically and emotionally draining. You need to be empathic, strong-minded, honest and driven, and our team is showing this in abundance. 2. What does the future look like for those you work with? The knock-on effects of COVID-19 in Bangladesh are extremely challenging, particularly for those living in poverty. We are already seeing severe food shortages, increases in domestic violence and child abuse, as well as impacts to mental health. Much of the country is still rebuilding after super-cyclone Amphan which hit in May, and many now face severe flooding as monsoon rains continue without pause. International solidarity is key to ensure no one is left behind during this crisis. https://azuko.org/ ATE ATE, through their three programmes: SNAP (Special Needs Awareness Programme) BizATE (Small Business Development Programme) and EducATE (access to education prgramme) work to reduce poverty in Lawra, rural Ghana, where the majority rely on subsistence farming and food is scarce for months at a time. 1. What does it mean to be an aid worker, working during the COVID-19 crisis? As the communities we work in become increasingly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are required to work flexibly, dynamically, and with the needs of our beneficiaries at the heart of every single decision we make. To be an aid worker in this crisis means putting down the plans that we had, pause the strategy that was agreed, stop in our tracks and put first and foremost the immediate needs of those we serve. The impact of COVID-19 has affected all nations, all races of all socio and economic contexts although much harder and concentrated for people on the frontline. In the midst of fear and panic, humanitarian aid is even more necessary than before. ‘Aid workers’ are truly vital during this crisis, they are undervalued, often forgotten, placed in high risk roles. 2. As an aid worker, what kind of world are you living in right now? A fearful and difficult one. One that seems hopeless for those in poverty, girls and women around the world, street children, refugees. But also, a hopeful one, seeing the kindness, the collaboration, community. This pandemic has pulled organisations, causes, groups and people together. The COVID-19 crisis has shaken the way we live, the way we work and made many of us reassess our priorities. At the organisational level it has shone a light on our staff, humanitarians on the frontline. 3. What does the future look like for those you work with? It is getting harder and harder. Climate changes, poor healthcare and educational infrastructures placing more pressure on local people, farmers, petty traders, disabled children and their families. It's harder to gain and sustain income, harder to grow crops, harder to receive necessary and proper healthcare. Our continuous constructive support to the poor especially now will be a sustenance to them and their families now and in the future. It’s also important not to let the increased social capital which has been build during the crises disappear. The community spirit, the wave of volunteering and the collaborative relationships being built need to be nurtured and not allowed to fade away.

#NeverMoreNeeded

Small International Development Charity Network (SIDCN) SIDCN is an online collective of 1300 members set up to amplify the voices of small international development charities. As a collective 68% of organisations have responded to the COVID-19 crisis directly, by continuing work as normal, or finding new and innovative ways to deliver their projects. 72% of small international development charities have seen increased demand for their services “Our frontline staff have been working tirelessly to deliver vital hygiene supplies to 2,455 families without access to the basics – soap, sanitiser, disinfectant, face masks and other PPE” - AzuKo Jo Ashbridge It has been found that the biggest single challenge facing these organisations is funding. These charities are not eligible to apply for the UK Government Coronavirus Community Support Fund, many UK funders have amended their giving criteria to only support UK-based projects and the DFID has ‘paused’ grants leaving charities in limbo.This has meant that 79% have raised their income through individual giving. This is refreshing and a motivator for small charities. Small charities have a unique advantage in that they are able to create impact at the micro level. 50% of charities that were surveyed are threatening to close within the next 12 months due to funding cuts and lack of available and eligible grants. Without these charities we will see a ripple effect that extends beyond UK unemployment rates but to the hundreds of thousands that each charity impacts globally. Local community members who run services depend on income to feed their families, send their children to school and provide a steady income for their health and wellbeing within the family and community. What we will see in the next 12 months has the potential of dismantling a large part of our interconnected global world we have worked so hard to build. DISH DISH was formed in 1991 as a charity offering information, advice and support to people with disabilities. The momentum behind forming DISH and working with other small charities in the area was to ensure the disability community weren’t left behind and that they could live their lives with dignity, choice and independence. Within the last few years and especially since the welfare reforms, the demand for their services has grown exponentially. The team also support older members of their community with attendance Allowance applications. It is a small team who all have lived experience of disability either as a parent, young carer and carer. It has been a period of uncertainty and has meant a complete full stop on any fundraising events they had planned, but also no more income via Trusts and Foundations which had raised some significant amounts early on in the year. It was understandable that this would happen. DISH had projected a return on fundraising and foundations alone to be in excess of £15,000 -£20,000. It meant huge pressure in trying to obtain emergency funding via various outlets and ensuring they could keep offering their services whilst planning for our post COVID-19 future. They furloughed an office member of staff and the other 3 caseworkers on a rotational basis so they could keep offering the service. This relieved some pressure on the salary bill, but as they don’t pay very much, it didn’t make a huge dent. DISH have come through it and are grateful to all the support we have had both locally and nationally. They have developed new financial processes and also worked on a new risk management strategy to ensure their sustainability. Claims for disability benefits have slowed (as per DWP) but they have still had requests for help. Appeals were halted or done over conference call. It is anticipated that there will be a tsunami of claims as we gently ease lockdown or when the pause on benefits changes stops. There is a backlog of appeals and they anticipate that their disability community to be hit very hard. DISH have always been needed, but they know they will have to increase capacity to meet the demand. Young Barnet Foundation Young Barnet Foundation is a membership organisation for hundreds of locally based children and young people’s charities/community groups delivering to young people across LB of Barnet. They invest in, connect and develop their members in a variety of ways to enhance opportunities, activities and services for the 99,000 young people across Barnet. YBF compliment the other infrastructure support across the borough. They work closely under a ‘Barnet Together’ collaboration with Inclusion Barnet and Volunteering Barnet to pool expertise and resources to support members who serve their communities. Coronavirus saw great work across the Barnet borough by many community groups as they set out to support and feed the most vulnerable during the crisis. Young Barnet Foundation have and will continue to work to help coordinate and support these groups over the coming months. Their two key funders are part of London Funders network and they have welcomed the swift confirmation that funders would be supportive and flexible with their funding. Short term funding is secured to support the work they do, but the longer-term future looks more insecure. Many fundraising events, like many other charities, have been curtailed and there is uncertainty about future funding availability. They have started to see members start to struggle. Their services to support and scaffold membership will be needed now more than ever as organisations see an increase in demand for their services whilst finding funding harder to achieve. YBF have seen this as an opportunity to explore different ways of working, how technology can best be used both in delivery and back office, for their organisations to help make tight finances go further as working practices are forced to be adapted. The small community based charities are deep routed and highly knowledgeable in their communities. Many having built up trusted relationships over many years, and as the full effect of the COVID-19 begins to show, many more will need their support. YBF are calling on everyone at this time to be a generous leader. Supporting charities doesn’t always have to always be financial donations. Individuals and businesses can offer time, expertise and space to your locally based charities. StreetDoctors StreetDoctors educate to prevent and reduce youth violence. As knowledge is power, they equip at-risk young people with the skills to save lives and the knowledge to make informed decisions about how to keep themselves and others safe. StreetDoctors was founded in 2008 by two medical students and a youth worker. They realised the young people most at risk of witnessing or being involved in violence did not know basic first-aid skills to help in an emergency. By putting young people at the centre of emergency first-aid provision, SD empowers them to become part of the solution to youth violence, rather than just being seen as part of ‘the problem’. StreetDoctors relies on voluntary donations and earned income from delivering training sessions. Lockdown has meant their healthcare volunteers and other supporters were not able to raise money to support the work. They have lost delivery income as we could not deliver sessions until they had developed a digital alternative or until lockdown eases. As a small staff team, they could not risk furloughing staff and suspending operations because there is still a need to be there for young people at-risk of violence, so they managed by reducing income. Youth violence is a major cause of death for young people in the UK; 1 in 20 young people know someone who carries a weapon and last year had the highest recorded knife crime offences since records began. On top of this, lockdown has exacerbated many of the root causes such as poverty and a lack of support and opportunities. StreetDoctors provides a lifesaving intervention in partnership with local communities across the UK that empowers young people to learn the skills that save lives. Their work is now more important than ever to protect our young people from harm. Yellow House Yellow House is a well-established and highly trusted Registered Charity and are recognised for our innovative ways of reaching out to and offering support to young people, particularly those isolated within society. Yellow House activities target those who are normally excluded or considered hard to reach, particularly those with social, environmental, physical or learning disadvantages. Yellow House takes a holistic approach to working with those young people normally excluded from decision making, enabling them to participate in all aspects of community life, as well as offering young people the opportunity to, not only, develop their own social and personal skills but also to develop as active citizens in today's world. Their work has changed with COVID-19. The outreach work in schools has ceased, a planned theatre performance around non-violence was cancelled and daily work at The House is on hold. They are, however, doing 3 Zoom Programmes per day, 7 days per week, several run by the young people themselves, including Art, Meditation, Creative Writing. Together with the young people, Yellow House have drawn up a Post COVID-19 Plan for the foreseeable future, including quite definite suggestions on how we wish to live in the, hopefully, brave new world.

Appreciation Day #SCWeek2020 - Priti Patel MP

Appreciation Day #SCWeek2020 - Caroline Lucas MP

Appreciation Day #SCWeek2020 - Damian Green MP

Appreciation Day #SCWeek2020 - Sir Edward Davey MP

Appreciation Day #SCWeek2020 - Ian Paisley MP

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Small Charities Coalition is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales; registered company number: 06462220;
and a charity registered in England and Wales, registered charity number: 1122297